Aug 11, 2020

Ten Videos on Seneca's Letters

Earlier this summer, I created seven new core concept videos on a selection of letters from the great Stoic philosopher Seneca, in which he ranges over a number of key topics, not just in Stoic, but also Aristotelian, Platonic, and other philosophical traditions.  Each video focuses on one of the Letters on Ethics: To Lucilius.

Adding these to the three I had produced previously for my Intro to Philosophy students, the sequence now covers a number of key topics, distinctions, and arguments in metaphysics and ethics.  Here is the set so far:

I will likely start shooting additional videos on Seneca's Letters later on this Fall.  

Aug 1, 2020

Sadler's Lecture Podcast Hits 200 Episodes!


A bit over two years ago, I created the Sadler's Lectures podcast.  Viewers had been asking me for years to convert some of my YouTube videos into downloadable podcasts that they could listen to anywhere.  I'd balked at it for a while, hesitating to add yet another activity to my chronically-full schedule, but then  decided that once I hit a certain level of monthly support on Patreon, I'd commit to starting a podcast.

Sadler's Lectures is exactly what it sounds like.  I'm not hosting a new podcast - not at this point - in which I'd do something different from my video lectures.  In fact, what I've done (with a very few exceptions) is take my already existing core concept videos and turn those into podcast episodes.  I generally boost and tinker with the sound quality, and then edit out all the filler words - "ums", "ahs", "y'knows" - and the pauses, tack on standard intros and outros, and then they're ready to release.

The podcast is officially sited on Soundcloud, but you can also get it on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Player FM, Himalaya, iHeartRadio, and quite likely some other places out there that have flown under my radar.  Sadler's Lectures episodes are also incorporated into TrueSciPhi Radio as well.

With the release of the last in the series (for now) on Albert Camus' work, The Myth of Sisyphus, Sadler's Lectures hit a new benchmark.  I've produced and released 200 episodes! (Actually 208, since I early-released a sequence on Epicurus to my Patreon supporters - I'll be releasing those episodes over this weekend and the coming week).

Since I keep producing core concept videos - I'm probably well past the 700 video mark - I'm not going to run out of content to edit into podcast episodes anytime soon.  I've been putting out abut 5 per week on average, so you can expect to see about 250 additional episodes a year if I keep it up!

At present, the podcast includes lectures on Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Epictetus, Anselm of Canterbury, Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Immanuel Kant, Soren Kierkegaard, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Friedrich Nietzsche, William James, Martin Heidegger, Gabriel Marcel, Rainer Maria Rilke, Hannah Arendt, Jean-Paul Sartre, Ursula K. Leguin, James Rachels, Lawrence Kohlberg, Mary Midgley, and John Rawls.  I'll be adding quite a few new authors as time goes on!

If you'd like to make a contribution to helping me continue my work making classic philosophical texts, thinkers, and topics accessible for people worldwide, consider becoming a monthly supporter on Patreon. If you'd like to make a one-time donation, you can do so directly on Paypal, or on Buy Me A Coffee.

Jul 30, 2020

Twelve Podcast Lectures on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics


Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is among my favorite works of philosophy.  I've been studying and teaching it for about half of my life at this point, and one of the portions of the text I like the most are the specific discussions of the virtues and the vices found in books 3 and 4.  Quite some time back, I created core concept videos on each of those as resources for students in my classes.

More recently, I took twelve core concept videos on those topics, converted the lectures to sound files, boosted the sound quality, and edited them into podcast episodes.  Then I uploaded and released them in my Sadler's Lectures podcast as a set.  

The entire sequence, covering all of the moral virtues -  except for justice (which gets its own much more complex treatment in book 5) - and the quasi-virtue of shame, amounts to about 3 1/2 hours of lectures examining Aristotle's treatments of these virtues and their opposed vices, along with helpful examples drawn from contemporary life.

Here are those podcast episodes:
If you'd like to make a contribution to helping me continue my work making classic philosophical texts, thinkers, and topics accessible for people worldwide, consider becoming a monthly supporter on Patreon. If you'd like to make a one-time donation, you can do so directly on Paypal, or on Buy Me A Coffee.

Jul 21, 2020

Seven Podcast Lectures on Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground


Fyodor Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground is a text I teach frequently in certain of my classes - Into to Philosophy, Ethics, and of course Existentialism - and quite some time back, I shot a series of core concept lecture videos covering the main ideas of the work.  In order to provide my students (and others) with additional resources, I've been converting my videos into podcast episodes.

There are seven podcast episodes in the sequence, running about two hours total, so one could listen to the entire set over the space of a walk or two, a long workout, or whatever else one would like.  Here are those seven episodes:
If you'd like to make a contribution to helping me continue my work making classic philosophical texts, thinkers, and topics accessible for people worldwide, consider becoming a monthly supporter on Patreon. If you'd like to make a one-time donation, you can do so directly on Paypal, or on Buy Me A Coffee.


Jul 17, 2020

Three Podcast Episodes on Lawrence Kohlberg and Moral Development


One of the thinkers whose work I teach in my Ethics classes is the psychologist Lawrence Kohlberg.  I tend to assign his essay "Moral Development: A Review of the Theory," which provides a good overview of his six stages of moral development, and also discusses its applications to and implications for K-12 education.  Some time back, I shot a sequence of three core concept videos covering the main ideas of the piece.

Recently, in order to provide the same lecture material to my students in another format, I edited the sound files from those videos into Sadler's Lectures podcast episodes.  I boost the sound quality where possible, and take out all of the"ums", "ahs", and other such filler, so that listeners get an improved lecture.

If you'd like to listen to or download these episodes, you can do so in a variety of places - Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Player FM, as well as other sites - but the best place to do so is on my Soundcloud.  Here's those three episodes:
All told, they come to a bit more than 40 minutes total playing time, so you can learn the basics about Kohlberg's moral development theory in the space of a commute, a walk, or a workout!

Jul 16, 2020

Wisdom for Life Radio Show Now On Podbean

My co-host, Dan Hayes, has taken all of our Wisdom for Life radio show episodes and put them into a podbean site.  Now it's way easier for fans of the show - one of the few philosophy-focused radio shows out there! - to find and listen to whatever episodes strike their interest.

The show episodes can also be found on Riverwest Radio's (WXRW 104.1 LP FM) channel Soundcloud site, but it can be a bit difficult to find them - like looking for the proverbial needles in a haystack.  So having them all curated into one spot is definitely a plus.

If you'd like to listen to the show when it airs on Saturdays at 4 PM Central Time, you can do so anywhere in the world by going to the Riverwest Radio page and clicking the "Listen Live" button. WXRW is a community radio station, funded entirely by contributors, producers, and the odd grant or two, so if you'd like to donate something to keeping that station going, here's where you can do that.

Here's the seventeen episodes we've produced so far. 
We hope you enjoy them and find them useful!

Jul 10, 2020

July Online AMA Session Coming Up Tomorrow!

It's time again to answer questions from my viewers, listeners, readers, supporters, and other fans.  So tomorrow, I'll be holding my monthly online AMA - an Ask Me Anything - session. It'll be taking place at Noon Central Time tomorrow.

If there's a question you've been wanting to ask me, pop in to the session and I'll hopefully have an answer for you. You'll want to get your questions in early, since these sessions tend to draw a lot of viewers, and many of them ask questions.

Since some people ask a lot of questions in these sessions, I give priority to participants who haven't yet had a question answered, rather than just answering multiple questions by the same person.

Here's the link to the session. You can click on it and go straight to the YouTube page. There you can get a question into the queue ahead of time, and you can also set a reminder for when the session starts, if you'd like.



If you'd like to watch and listen to any of the earlier AMA sessions - you can also see what all the questions and comments were for that session by looking at the chat replay on the left side of the screen - here's a link to a playlist containing all of them.

All of the work involved in these free online events are underwritten by my Patreon supporters. Their pledges help me earn a living for myself and my family doing work I love - making philosophy accessible to people of all walks of life, all over the world.

If you'd like to become a supporter, here's where you can do that.